Scoring

 

Craft Beer Makes Its Entrance into the Mainstream

I like to use the Untappd five star system. The five star system is pretty simple – zero stars for piss water beer and five stars for excellent beer.  You get a quarter of a star to measure out the distances between beer – so a three and a quarter star is higher than a two and three quarter star beer.

It seems pretty well and good, but I decided to add some functional characteristics to the list.  Think of it as “Untappd Plus.” These functional characteristics let people know that there are actual differences to the beer that is scored this way, rather than just being the result of a lot of stars. They are as follows:

Four stars is a rating that tells people that this beer is really worth trying, as opposed to the three star beers. Three stars I liked, but four stars something special. Four, four and a quarter, four and a half and four and three quarters all fall into this category.

Five star beers do not exist in my world and I will explain that in a minute.

In addition to a four star “hey this is really worth your time,” I have also begun weighting the beer results.  The weighting system is simple. Rather than each step in the process being equivalent to a single added quarter star (this two and a quarter star is one sum higher than a two star), it is a product, which is a multiple higher than an additive. So a three star product is three stars higher product (rather than a sum) than a two and three quarter star.

So as the products increase in their range is greater than the sum.

And what happens to a five star rating? The five star rating is for “perfect” beers and there are no perfect beers

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